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    PROTECT your children
    PROTECT your investment
    PROTECT your home

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    Many houses built before 1978 have paint that is lead-based.  Lead from paint chips and dust can pose serious health hazards if not taken care of properly. 

    Get the Lead Out! (GTLO) is a multi-agency coalition whose vision is to "end childhood lead poisoning among children in Kent County."  The City of Grand Rapids Community Development Department is a partner in this initiative.  The Community Development Housing Rehabilitation Office offers information on lead poisoning and its symptoms, and assistance in removing the lead through the Lead Hazard Control Program.

    What causes lead poisoning?
    Lead-based paint was used in many homes built before 1978.  The older the home, the more likely that windows, cupboards, doors, porches, and outdoor surfaces have lead-based paint.

    Lead dust is the most common form of lead poisoning in children.  Lead dust comes from normal wear and tear from opening doors and windows and other painted areas.  The dust settles to floor and gets on children's hands and toys, and it enters their bodies when they put their hands or toys in their mouths.

    How can I tell if my child has been exposed to lead?
    Have your child tested.  A simple blood test is all it takes to determine if your child has been exposed to lead.  Ask your pediatrician to test your child or visit the Kent County Health Department.  The Health Department offers low cost testing.

    More information on the Get the Lead Out! program can be found by contacting:

    Paul Haan
    Get the Lead Out!
    Healthy Homes Coalition of West Michigan

    742 Franklin Street SE
    Grand Rapids, Michigan 49507
    Phone: (616) 241-3300
    Fax: (616) 241-3327
    E-mail: paul@healthyhomescoalition.org
    Web: www.healthyhomescoalition.org

     

    For more information on lead exposure and answers to more common questions, download this brochure (en Espanol) from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or visit the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) website.